David Sanger

Sunday, June 6, 2010

David

David died on Friday 28 May 2010 at his home in Cumbria. If you would like to leave a tribute or memory, please do so by adding a comment to this posting.

Please click on "Comments" and once you have finished your tribute choose "Name/URL" from the "Comment as:" drop-down menu. Then type your name in the appropriate box and leave "URL" blank.

96 comments:

  1. Peter Allison from Goole, East YorksJune 6, 2010 at 9:50 PM

    I am so sad, I did not really know him, except though FaceBook, but when he was playing a recital in York Minster last year, I asked him if I could record it, "no problem, but can I have a copy for myself" he said. Thank you David, I will treasure that recording

    ReplyDelete
  2. David was an remarkably gifted teacher and a performer of outstanding talent. Above all, he was an loyal and dear friend for very nearly 40 years: I will miss him profoundly.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks for all the great times, David. Such a kind, thoughtful, generous and reliable friend.

    ReplyDelete
  4. As a post graduate student on a Danish scholarship, I studied with David for 3 years. He was a remarkable teacher and went to great length to support me in so many ways. I visited him in his Lake District Chapel and was taken for one of the most memorable walks/climbs of my life, equipped with ice axes etc .Before my Debut Concert in Copenhagen he went there himself to ensure that the registrations I used were the best possible. The tragedy which has befallen him will never overshadow his dedication ,commitment and musicianship. The David we knew will not be forgotten.
    Ellen Myrup

    ReplyDelete
  5. To all of you who mourn for David Sanger: feel free to memorize what he meant to you while watching and listening to this small organ piece dedicated to the memory of David:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RirTngYgqiw
    Requiescat in pace.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I have known David since 1972. The generous tributes on this page and elswhere testify to a generous and warm human being, a fact of which I can confirm. His death comes as a profund shock to those of us who admired him both as a great human being and a prodigiously talented musician. As an amateur organist I owe him a debt of gratitude for his encouragement and friendship. I have a sadness too deep for tears.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I really am profoundly sad to hear of this. I still can't believe it. It came as a complete shock to me, not least because I only saw David in March and he seemed fit as a fiddle. He was a great teacher and musician and I was fond of him. I always enjoyed my lessons. We shall all miss David immensely.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I offer my deepest condolences to David's family. A smashing musician and friend.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Such sad news. I am so very sorry.

    ReplyDelete
  10. A great loss

    ReplyDelete
  11. You were an inspiration to so many. RIP

    ReplyDelete
  12. Requiescat in pace

    ReplyDelete
  13. I cannot express my grief. Your students love and respect you, and we are all so extraordinarily grateful to you for everything you've done for us - none of us would be where we are were it not for you. May light perpetual shine upon you, my dear, dear friend and mentor.

    ReplyDelete
  14. On and on the rain will fall
    Like tears from a star
    On and on the rain will say
    How fragile we are

    ReplyDelete
  15. Juliet AbrahamsonJune 11, 2010 at 10:48 PM

    I am so sorry to hear the dreadfully sad news about someone I've known, admired and respected for many, many years. My condolences to David's family for their loss; a great loss also for the organ fraternity and for us all.

    ReplyDelete
  16. We were deeply saddened and shocked to her this news. Our thoughts go out to his family during this difficult time. David will always be remembered.

    ReplyDelete
  17. This is so sad. RIP

    ReplyDelete
  18. RIP David, and thank you for everything.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Alwyn Torquil Francis LadellJune 11, 2010 at 10:50 PM

    Your music will live on through your excellent recordings.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Thanks so much Mister Sanger, for having me discover Joseph Jongen's Sonata Eroica out of that just wonderfull, veritable and quite unequalled 1972 recording of yours at Bath Abbey; may you rest in wonderfull Peace. RIP JW

    ReplyDelete
  21. It was great knowing you. I remember when you played Rhosymedre in Fotherighey church, I was simply stunned. You will be sorely missed.

    ReplyDelete
  22. David you will be so greatly missed RIP

    ReplyDelete
  23. david i cannot express my shock and sadness at what has happened to someone who was such a stong influence and for whom i had such enormous respect...you gave so much to so many people, and the essence of your playing and teaching was honesty and integrity. thank god that so many people were influenced by these qualities - you have truly left a wonderful legacy. love always and RIP

    ReplyDelete
  24. Hannah Danson (nee Sanger)June 11, 2010 at 10:53 PM

    On behalf of David's family, thankyou all for the kind words.
    it's encouraging to us all to know that Uncle David was valued by so many, and influenced so many people in their lives and music.
    His legacy will be in the many fine organists with whom he worked over the years.
    Thankyou all for your support.

    ReplyDelete
  25. I was deeply, deeply saddened when I heard this terrible news. My heartfelt condolences go to his family and many close friends all over the world. RIP

    ReplyDelete
  26. Susan Dawn HonnorJune 11, 2010 at 10:54 PM

    I too was deeply saddened by this news. I learnt to play the organ from your tutor books. I was looking forward to your recital in Canterbury later this year. RIP

    ReplyDelete
  27. rest in peace..

    ReplyDelete
  28. I will never forget his cheeky grin and sense of fun! RIP David.

    ReplyDelete
  29. RIP David. Thank you so much for all the advice you have given me about the organ over the past 18 months. You will be a huge loss to the world of music.

    ReplyDelete
  30. I am so so saddened by this tragic loss. Thank you David for so much inspiration. God reward you for your kindness.

    ReplyDelete
  31. David was an inspiration to me for over 30 years, and a great friend. There is no-one else like him and no-one else with his encylopaedic knowledge and eagerness to communicate it. This is the most terrible loss for all of us. His was a unique flame. Let's strive to keep it burning.

    ReplyDelete
  32. Rest in Peace David, not only an excellent musician, but also an unfailingly kind, compassionate and generous man. I will greatly miss your valuable friendship.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Very sad news. RIP David!

    ReplyDelete
  34. An insightful teacher, inspiring mentor, faithful friend. Your boundless physical and mental energy allowed you to inspire so many through your recordings, performances and your teaching. Yet, it was your empathic humanity, charm and wit that so endeared you. Your influence will remain and you will never be forgotten. Requiem aeternam dona ei, Domine, et lux perpetua luceat ei.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Hugo Agius MuscatJune 11, 2010 at 10:59 PM

    Thank you for having been an inspiration to me as a teacher and a performer for over twenty years. RIP

    ReplyDelete
  36. David... we are all lost for words. We shared the same teacher some 40+ years ago and David, you were, for me, as for many others, a wonderful aspirational role model, both as a player and more recently as a teacher. Your loss will be keenly felt by everyone. We have your family and close friends in our prayers. Rest in peace, dear David. Colleague and friend.

    ReplyDelete
  37. Thanks for your early influence on my life, David, and your friendship, generosity and encouragement since. You will be sorely missed. RIP

    ReplyDelete
  38. RIP David - inspirational figure....

    ReplyDelete
  39. I was so pleased to meet you at the conferment ceremony in March and so sad to hear this news. RIP David

    ReplyDelete
  40. David, although I never knew you personally, you were a big shining beacon in the organ world. May it long live on in all the young budding musicians you have inspired over the years. Lux perpetua luceat tibi et in paradisum deducant te angeli!

    ReplyDelete
  41. I still cannot believe this terrible news. David was such a kind, thoughtful, funny and inspirational teacher and friend, and I shall miss him terribly. I will never forget my lessons with him, beginning at school, going through university and then beyond, and I shall always fondly remember him giving me the run-around on the badminton court! I wish I'd had the chance to see him one last time, if only to hear that mischievous laugh and see that twinkle in his eyes. A desperately sad end for such a generous, talented and kind individual. David, rest in peace. Ryan Hepburn, Music Dept., St Paul's School, London.

    ReplyDelete
  42. Phillip Gearing (Toowoomba, Australia)June 13, 2010 at 6:38 AM

    David's memory will ever be treasured. I was fortunate to study with David during 1985, and those lessons remain with me. David had the knack of making me feel at ease so that I could give of my best. Always encouraging, he was a perceptive and inspiring teacher, bringing one to new and undreamed-of levels of understanding and music making; he also was incredibly generous with his time, resources and vast knowledge, long after the official student-teacher period. Having been in email contact with David only one week before, the news of his death came as a great shock - one which is still hard to comprehend and assimilate. My sincere condolences are extended to David's family - you must feel his loss so keenly. Rest in peace, David.

    ReplyDelete
  43. Rest in peace David.
    Thank you for playing my "Dances under open Skies" so wonderfull 13 times in 2004 and 2005.
    Flemmming Friis, composer

    ReplyDelete
  44. Richard SheppardJune 13, 2010 at 3:05 PM

    David kindly autographed one of his LP's for me in 1979, wishing me a successful career in organ building (I was a very junior apprentice at the time). It later became my priviledge to work on the organ at Embleton and I have treasured memories of wonderful dinners, walks on the fells, animated discussions on music...
    Thank you for warm friendship and such innate musicianship from which I have learnt so much.

    ReplyDelete
  45. David.Thankyou for 40 years of friendship .Thankyou for your humour,your patience,your encouragement,your humanity.Everyone who met you knew they where in the company of a very special person.You will always be in my thoughts.Be at peace.

    ReplyDelete
  46. May you rest in peace, David. I was hoping to meet you someday in this life; I hope we will meet in the next.

    ReplyDelete
  47. I was a pupil of David's on and off for over 25 years - I now wish I had made more effort to have lessons during the breaks. He was a wonderfully inspirational and encouraging teacher, and I particularly cherish the odd ploughman's lunch he provided because I had travelled such a distance - as well as nattering in his kitchen about projects he was involved in, instruments he had played etc. I would not enjoy playing half so much had he not taught me how. An amazing generosity of spirit - an utter tragedy.

    ReplyDelete
  48. I owe everything to David. He was a wonderful teacher and friend and will be greatly missed.

    ReplyDelete
  49. When I think of David I remember his incredibly generosity in sharing the chapel. We had holidays there with two or three families. The chapel would be full to bursting. I remember long walks on the fells starting early and finishing late. David would show us the best routes and find the best pubs. When I look back I am amazed at his incredible kindness. Thank you David for being such a good friend to my family. We are all so sad at your loss. RIP

    ReplyDelete
  50. From myself and our mutual friend Mike Manners, rest in peace.

    ReplyDelete
  51. I am still reeling at this tragic news. Thank you David for 4 years' inspirational, humourous and patient teaching. You have left a priceless legacy which will live on not just in your scholarship, compositions and recordings, but through your teaching will will be passed down the generations. May you rest in peace.

    ReplyDelete
  52. David Sanger's death is a great loss to the world of the organ, and, I'm certain, to many personal friends. I knew him only slightly, having met him after his excellent recital in Copenhagen Cathedral quite a few years ago.
    But recently I emailed him with some questions about Vierne, and he replied soon that he did remember me, and then dealt with my questions. Among
    organists I know either closely or just as acquaintances he certainly was a
    first rate communicator and a real professional in every respect. James Johnson - Organist in Adolphus Busch Hall at Harvard 1971-1991

    ReplyDelete
  53. I did not know David well, but will never forget the 3 or 4 lessons I had with him as a young student ; utterly inspirational. I have never met any other music teacher with his ability to combine practical, technical detail with profound musical insight. At the end of the lesson he would modestly suggest that he might play through the piece for me. There would then follow a perfect performance (with a witty but perceptive commentary as he went along). The most extraordinary thing, however, was that instead of leaving one reduced by his exceptional ability, you were left feeling that you too could play as well as that, because he believed in you and wanted you to play as well as him. So crowning all his talents as a teacher was the gift - how rare - of directing a student whilst leaving them, above all, free to be themselves. What a terrible loss. David ; RIP.

    ReplyDelete
  54. Niels Erichsen, DenmarkJune 18, 2010 at 9:58 AM

    David Sanger was a kind and friendly man. My wife Bente and I knew him as a man with a fine sense of humour who liked a well-cooked dinner. He met all people with true interest and took great care in his students. He was always interested in news about old students, friends and all the people he met during concert tours around the world.
    He did not seek the limelight or wanted to act like a star. He was just a man playing the organ – but he played like a star.
    We shall miss his fantastic playing and his characteristic laughter.

    ReplyDelete
  55. I met David at a César Franck Contest in Haarlem, The Netherlands, where he was a member of the jury. I am involved in the organisation of these contests. My collegues and I had dinner with the jury, I was seated near David and talked a lot with him. He had practised on my organ in St. Joseph Church and had played an outstanding improvisation. He was very pleased with the organ. I will remember him as a charming,witty and very gifted person. May he rest in peace.
    Gemma Coebergh, Haarlem, the Netherlands.

    ReplyDelete
  56. David was an aoutstanding gentleman, and was a great honour to know him. I know he did a lot of work for the music comunity, and was an amazing player at the Organ. I will miss him as a friend and a sports partner when we got out. I will always rememeber him by the comments we shouted over the valley in Embleton after an evening out at the pub. I will always drive past the chapel thinking that you were a true saint. RIP David.

    ReplyDelete
  57. Wow! All the comments from the numerous people in this collection of tributes reflect on how great an influence David Sanger had on many organists from around the world, particularly as an inspirational teacher. I had lessons with him for the past 10 years and he helped me hugely to improve my playing. I will always remember his great qualities as a kind and friendly human-being as well as scholar, tutor and musician (all roles that he seemed to be equally excellent at!). RIP David.

    ReplyDelete
  58. I was priveleged to be taught by David after the FRCO and it was at that point that he revolutionised my playing. His electrifying performance of Vierne 3 on the most unlikely instrument of St Mary's Nottingham got me hooked on that composer for the rest of my life. I also well remember the few drinks we had afterwards and then him setting off in his old VW camper the wrong way around the one-way system and talking himself out of it when the police stopped him. An extraordinarily kind man who always had time for you and never failed to inspire.

    ReplyDelete
  59. I didn't know david sanger, but what a tragedy. Such an inspiring player - a real loss RIP

    ReplyDelete
  60. I knew David for some time from a good 30 years ago, when we were both on the committee of Bexley Organists' Association. He was an inspiring player and a good friend, and he didn't stop being a friend when he moved to Cumbria. I sang in a Bach Choir concert in Bergen, Norway, in the late 1980s, and David was in the audience, spotted me and came to find me afterwards; we then went out for several (expensive Norwegian) beers, for which he insisted on paying. This is very boring to anyone else, but for me it showed that the internationally famous David didn't forget old friends. I last saw him at his brilliant recital in Westminster Cathedral a few months before his death, and I'm so glad I went and heard him one last time at his best. We must regret the waste of his tragic end, but also celebrate the music he shared with so many.

    ReplyDelete
  61. I knew David Sanger for many years, both during his time at the Oundle for Organists summer schools and on two occasions with a group of students in Toulouse. He was a truly accomplished teacher and performer - giving up considerable time to the benefit of all. A true gentlemen who will be sadly missed.

    ReplyDelete
  62. David Johnson (Cheshire)June 28, 2010 at 5:47 PM

    I didn't know David personally, but was a great admirer of his God-given abilities. I hope the planned 2011 celebration of his life will take place in a suitably enormous place, so that all his friends, and those 'jobbing-organists' like myself, will be able to come and celebrate his life. God

    ReplyDelete
  63. David was a superb teacher: patient, phenomenally knowledgeable, and good-humoured. I remember the inspirational lessons at Christ Church and Exeter fondly, and I still use the Bach fingerings that he carefully wrote into my copies. He was a generous, erudite, witty man and I mourn his passing.

    ReplyDelete
  64. David was an inspired player, a true musician. His recording of Widor's 5th will always be the definitive choice for me! Such sad times we live in.

    ReplyDelete
  65. TRIBUTE INCLUDED IN ALBERT HALL NOTTINGHAM ORGAN RECITAL PROGRAMME 06/06/10

    DAVID SANGER 1947-2010

    Since we went to press news has reached us of the sad death of David Sanger on 27 May.

    He played twice in Nottinghamshire in recent years, at the Albert Hall in 1995 and the following year on the new Quire organ in Southwell Minster. At both recitals he performed music of his
    own, and both times I had to ring him up to gain information
    about the pieces. He was extremely friendly and helpful, telling
    me about his house organ (which in his youth had been at his local church in Bexleyheath before being transplanted to his home in Cumbria) and sharing anecdotes about organ playing.

    His compositions were often written for specific instruments, notably the spatially-divided organs in Westminster and St Paul’s Cathedrals, and his playing showed immense understanding of the possibilities of any instrument.

    His recorded legacy included what must have been some of the
    first recordings of the complete Vierne symphonies, on the Anneessens / Walker organ at the Italian Church Clerkenwell
    along with Widor V at the same location; there was also a fine record at Bath Abbey of the Jongen Sonata Eroica and the Boëllmann Suite Gothique.

    He had studied with Marie-Claire Alain, Anton Heiller and
    Susi Jeans, and his own pupils include Carol Williams,
    David Goode and Simon Williams.
    (IW)

    ReplyDelete
  66. Davids death was a very tragic one and I am very saddened to have heard about it.He was a very influential teacher and having lost another of my former teachers seven months ago this has come as another sad loss. Rest in peace David.

    ReplyDelete
  67. In the early 1960’s my husband, Michael Perkins was organist at St. John’s Church, Erith, Kent. He was arranging concerts in order to raise money to have the organ (Bishop) refurbished.
    One day Stan Sanger arrived on our doorstep with his young son David – aged about 15 years. Until that time David had given recitals only in his own church at Bexleyheath and Stan thought David could help by giving one at Erith. Michael said he would consider it, but not until he had heard David play! David did his ‘Audition’ at Erith, by playing a Bach Trio Sonata - probably note perfect – from memory. He got his recital and many more. Michael remarked to me afterwards that ‘I think this lad will go far’ !!!!!
    Our friendship lasted over 45 years, during which time he played for our elder daughter’s wedding and took part in the Memorial Concert for Michael. We were always made most welcome by David and his parents when we visited them in the Lake District when on holiday. He also had ‘B & B’ 3 times a term with us, when visiting his Oxford students. The evenings were always hilarious. I shall always remember his kindness, generosity and humour. We feel that we gave David his very first real recital. We have lost a very dear friend.
    Good night David. R.I.P.
    Pat

    ReplyDelete
  68. I met David on several occasions while he was Consultant for a major overhaul of the organ at Christ Church Eastbourne in 2008. He was a kind, humorous, knowledgeable and above all supremely accomplished musician whose fell-walking obviously came in handy as he clambered around inside the instrument. News of his death was a great shock.

    ReplyDelete
  69. A really kind, generous and above all patient (!) teacher. RIP David.

    ReplyDelete
  70. Justin Vickery (Norway)July 27, 2010 at 12:34 AM

    As a frequent visitor to Norway, David will be greatly missed here too. I was very fortunate to have studied with such a dedicated and inspiring teacher. I will never forget his recital at Birmingham Town Hall when I was the page turner.

    ReplyDelete
  71. I too feel very fortunate to have had the chance to study with such an inspiring teacher. David always had such patience: I could never find enough time to practise, but he was always so kind! He will be greatly missed.

    ReplyDelete
  72. One of David's former students, Henry Fairs, is performing a recital in his memory on August 22nd, in Normandy. More details here http://www.henryfairs.com/news1 .
    Thanks Henry.

    ReplyDelete
  73. Only today, Aug 3rd have I received my copy of the RAM newsletter. There I read of the death of David, one of my earliest Piano students at the RAM when I was still fairly new on the Full-time staff. I am deeply shocked & saddened at the loss of someone so valuable in the world of music. David was already a good pianist when he arrived at the RAM,maybe aged 15-16. We kept in touch over the years, though my return to live in NZ (Dec '79) meant I missed his live performances. However, I shall never forget noticing David, his brother & parents sitting in the Purcell Rm (my piano recital in the 1960s). Later a note came in the post thanking me, expressing the Sangers' pleasure etc, but what I remember exactly was David's last 'quip' - "please let us know when you are playing there again - the seats are so comfy"! I was also very fortunate when travelling to Shetland (via Glasgow)in 1997-or 8, to have broken my journey at Cockermouth, staying the night at 'THE Old Weslyan Ch..' What wonderful extensions, carpentry etc & hearing the organ. If you read this Peter, I have not forgotten you either, thought of you when Guy J died. Please accept my deepest sympathy, Georgina Zellan-Smith, formerly Prof at the RAM, 1959 -'79.

    ReplyDelete
  74. Yesterday I stumbled across David's recording of Widor 5 and Jongen Eroica et al in HMV and bought it straight away. It is playing as I write this...it has been playing all day! His recordings remind us all of the sad loss of an excellent player and lover of the organ and its music. May he rest in peace.

    ReplyDelete
  75. Pupils, friends and admirers may wish to know that there is to be a MEMORIAL RECITAL in central London to pay musical tribute to David. Given by Hans Fagius (his duet partner) and four pupils who have themselves become international recitalists (David Goode, David Aprahamian Liddle, Stephen Farr and James Lloyd Thomas), it begins at 1pm on Monday 1st November, in ST MICHAEL'S CORNHILL, EC3. Admission is free.
    Jonathan

    ReplyDelete
  76. The Celebration Concert organised by David's family will be held on Saturday 5 March 2011 at 2.30pm at Great St Mary's, the University Church in Market Square, Cambridge. More information on David's website www.davidsanger.co.uk

    ReplyDelete
  77. No wonder David didn't answer my calls ! I am shocked and at a loss to learn that my long-time friend has died.
    David and I often shared the organ stool on childhood outings with our local organists association in Kent; and later, he attempted to teach our mutual friend Clive Brearley and I how beer should be drunk ! Wonderful memories of David, Clive, and myself 'talking shop' over a good pint.

    Not just a wonderful world-class musician, a kind and humble gentleman.

    ReplyDelete
  78. David was a close and dear friend to me and my wife Ingrid and his death was a great shock. I first met David during the competition in Munich in 1972 (which he won) and in the following years we stayed in close contact, both through his numerous visits to Norway and my frequent trips to UK.
    In later years there were longer intervals between us seeing each other, but as late as October 2009 David once more stayed overnight in our home as so often before, and in November he was for the last time in Oslo, playing a brilliant recital. David would always have an answer to almost any question I could ask about any organlitterature and our discussions were always enlightening and rewarding. We will forever remember him as the kindest and most gentle person – as well as an outstanding artist. He was one of the finest performers I ever knew. I do really miss him.

    ReplyDelete
  79. Rémy Poilane, FranceNovember 3, 2010 at 10:51 PM

    I am astonished; I just discovered a few minutes ago the death of David. We were in contact through Internet.
    He used to play three small pieces composed by Maurice Lenormand around 1915. M Lenormand was my teacher until 1965. He died in 1981 and we were trying to organise a concert where David could play on M Lenormand’s organ, in Macon in France.
    We contemplated a concert in 2011 for the 30 years anniversary of M Lenormand death.
    Further to a visit to a son of M Lenormand (Albert, a reknown painter aged 96), I could find an unpublished small piece composed by M Lenormand that David intended to play. Did he do so in a concert ? I am very sad.

    ReplyDelete
  80. Christopher EnstonNovember 5, 2010 at 4:54 PM

    Deeply shocked and saddened by the dreadful loss of David Sanger. He was inspirational at the RAM - treasured memories of the students' visit to Paris he organised in 1986 - I found my photos of it the other day! There was no wiser champion of the organ and its repertoire than DS - if you wanted to know the best way of playing anything, you simply listened to him. He continues to inspire. A great fellow to have known and I think of him still.

    ReplyDelete
  81. I was deeply shocked and saddened by the loss of this extremely talented former schoolmate. Having been isolated in central Europe for some time, I have only just learned of this tragedy. My sympathies to Peter and his family.

    ReplyDelete
  82. Solrun Fluge FaullFebruary 6, 2011 at 7:21 PM

    David was a dear friend of our family for 35 years!We first got to know hime as a brilliant young organ recitalist from England, who needed somewhere to stay whilst going on his first recital tour with the Norwegian Organ Circle in the mid-1970s. My father, Dag Fluge, and the rest of us came to almost regard him as part of our family over the following decades, as he loved touring in Scandinavia - although his Norwegian lessons never seemed to lead anywhere! As my father's health has suffered dramatically over the past few years, we didn't see David as often, although he remained a caring friend and collegue.He made, however, a special trip to see my parents shortly before his tragedy unfolded. David followed his visit up with the most beautiful letter , which in retrospect was his farewell to my parents...He was a warm and generous person, talented but modest, curious but cautious. May you rest in peace.

    ReplyDelete
  83. David was a classmate of mine at Eltham and kept his light under a bushel. We all knew he was musically talented but until now and these tragic circumstances had not realised how talented he was. Although I left school and never saw him again, I still mourn his passing. It seems the world has lost another brilliant musician who it would seem has been an inspiration to so many.
    RIP David from David

    ReplyDelete
  84. I was privileged to have David as my teacher at the RAM and afterwards some 25 years ago. I will never forget his charm and friendliness, while being uncompromising about expected standards and quality of interpretation! Many aspects of interpretation of organ music somehow made sense for the first time under his tuition. I have never forgotten the principles he taught me. He will be missed greatly.

    ReplyDelete
  85. A year has not diminished the sadness felt at David's passing. He meant so much to so many.

    ReplyDelete
  86. I learned about David's death just today. I vividly remember his fantastic concert in Molde, Norway -- in particular his rendition of Fantasy and Fugue on B-A-C-H by Reger. He wrote a nice greeting in my copy of "Play the Organ" afterwards, and we talked a bit. Wonderful artist and person. R.I.P.

    ReplyDelete
  87. There is a story David told me which I would like to share with you. He was such a good teller of tales and I could have cheerfully sat with him for hours when he should have been listening to me play, and merely heard his wise input.

    We were in his kitchen in Embleton and I chose to broach a subject which for me was difficult, but as ever he made it easy. I asked him how he coped with nerves before a recital, and as he poured water on the tea he said “Oh surely Gavin, you of ALL people don’t suffer with nerves!?”

    As I said, he made it easy.

    He gave me an amazing scenario which ever since then has worked for me – if you need the gist of it do email me. However, he did tell me of the time he was due to play at the proms in the Albert Hall. All was ready, and he checked with the BBC production manager that the organ was ready to go. “Absolutely Mr Sanger – all you have to do is go up and play.” And so the time came. He ascended the stairs, and described the sound as you got nearer the top. He said that although people were only chatting, as you got into the open it was like being hit by a roar.

    The audience quietened down and he prepared himself for the opening piece. He played the first note, and….Nothing.

    The organ hadn’t been turned on.

    He said to me slightly ruefully, “It takes a full two minutes for the organ to be turned on from scratch – so I pushed the button and had to sit there, in full view, on live TV, and the Internet – just waiting. At that moment I felt very humble.”

    Since then, getting a bit jittery before a minor gig in front of the public has somehow seemed less of a hurdle.

    ReplyDelete
  88. Richard AstridgeJuly 31, 2012 at 9:44 AM

    I met David Sanger a couple of times only, lastly at Canterbury Cathedral where he gave a wonderful recital on the fine Willis organ just a few years ago. He very kindly allowed me to record him, and I gave him a copy of the recording I made, which I hope will be preserved and used now to endorse the fact that he was indeed a very fine musician. I found him perfectly charming and a pleasure to talk with, and his passing is a very sad, sorry story, and I know he is missed by very many. I consider it a privilege and a joy to have met him, albeit only briefly.

    Richard Astridge, Liverpool

    ReplyDelete
  89. I only just found out about David's passing today. On my birthday in 2010, as it happens. I met him only once, at Westminster Cathedral, after an amazing performance of Vierne's fifth. I thanked him for writing his wonderful tutor book, which started me off on the organ. When I heard about courses in the Lake District, I had a little dream that one day I'd be able to take one with a true hero. It just goes to show, if you want to do something, do it now and don't put it off. Thank you David, I'll never forget you.

    Dan O'Connell, Somerset.

    ReplyDelete
  90. MICHAEL GARLICK
    I had the pleasure of recording his playing at Catford
    in 1969 and realised then that he would become famous as his playing was flawless (he must have been only 22). Fortunately, I made the recording is stereo on a professional recorder and it still sounds great today!
    Not only that, he was one of the nicest people I have ever met and was well regarded by those in the church he was organist for.

    ReplyDelete
  91. I've just bought a CD of David's recording of Widor's Fifth Symphony and other French organ works. I hadn't heard the first movement since I lent my LP of Marcel Dupre playing it to somebody who didn't return it. This is a wonderful recording and it's brought back very happy memories. Thank you. You were a wonderful player.

    ReplyDelete
  92. I only just found out that David was dead, and am so sorry to hear it. After hearing many recordings of Widor's 5th, an old favourite of mine, I cannot get over how superior his is to any other commercial recording available: he had the truly great musician's gift of making every single thing interesting - my attention never lapses at any point. I'm sure his family has many regrets about his death, but I would like to add my regret that he never recorded a Widor cycle as I'm sure it would have been the definitive one. It's cold comfort I'm sure, but he leaves an amazing legacy of wonderful music for successive generations to enjoy.

    ReplyDelete
  93. Today would have been David's 70th birthday. Still missing him greatly and thinking of him with much love.

    ReplyDelete
  94. I was also a classmate of David's at Eltham College. As a budding musician at school I was in awe of David's great musical talent; he was always very helpful and encouraging to me musically and such a nice person. I was very shocked to hear of his untimely death.

    ReplyDelete